Department Overview

서브메뉴박스배경

서브로그인배경

Curriculum

ELT Core Courses

TESOL1: Theory & Practice
In this course, we will explore the theory and practice of teaching ESL pedagogy. We will learn about the linguistic, psychological, social, and intellectual implications of the process of learning a second language while maintaining the first language. Students will analyze and compare L1 and L2 acquisition theories and pedagogical issues, and apply strategies related to second language learning in a cross-cultural setting, particularly in the EFL context in Korea. In this way students are provided with knowledge and tools for their classroom teaching and beyond, ultimately promoting continual professional growth.


TESOL2: Theory & Practice

In this course, we will explore the theory and practice of teaching English as a second or foreign language pedagogy in the cross-cultural settings, particularly in Korea. In this way students are provided with knowledge and tools for their classroom teaching and beyond, ultimately promoting continual professional growth.


Lesson Design

The purpose of this course is to help students develop the ability to create English language learning lesson plans. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to think critically about the principles of communicative language teaching and how to best create lessons that help language learners achieve communicative competence. By the end of the course, students will be able to:
1. design language learning activities and tasks for each of the four language skills,
2. sequence these activities and tasks so as to ensure effective language learning,
3. describe the characteristics of a good lesson plan based on the principles of CLT.


Course Design

This course is intended for students interested in designing more effective curricula and assessment. Specifically, students will learn how to effectively construct course and/or unit plans
through a conceptual framework (i.e. construct goals & objectives, plan sequencing of activities/
tasks, and determine type of assessment) that easily makes sense of content and language
skills. The unit plans developed by students will then constitute one of the main components of the student’s graduating portfolio, and can also serve as an excellent model for future planning.


Portfolio Development (Portfolio Track)

The Graduating Portfolio is intended to be a culminating project in the GS of TESOL program that illustrates a “capstone research experience.” Accordingly, it should synthesize and apply knowledge and theories gained from courses in the GS of TESOL program. It should meet the following criteria:

- be integrative; requires generation/application of ideas across courses; demonstrates learning.
- result in a concrete product that links ESL/EFL theory and research to practice.
- be of personal use to the student & educationally valuable by an audience of professional peers.
At the end of the course, Graduate School of TESOL students should have several basic components constructed that will constitute their portfolio.


Research Methodology 1 or 2 (Thesis Track)

This course is an introduction to the concepts, approaches, and methods of QUANTITATIVE research in TESOL and applied linguistics. Topics include formulation of research questions, research design, data collection, data analysis, and reporting research results. The course provides opportunities to read and critique empirical research papers. It also provides hands-on experience of planning empirical research on a topic of student interest.

 

 

ELT CD Core Courses


Multimedia-Assisted Language Learning

This course aims to introduce students to key concepts and major recent developments in MALL (Multimedia-Assisted Language Learning). Throughout the course, students will link rationale based on theory, research and experience with specific techniques intended to help students develop their English abilities.

Accordingly, this course familiarizes English language teachers to specific techniques for using MALL to teach vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, listening, speaking, communication skills, and content-based language. No background in multimedia or computers is necessary; rather, it is hoped that students will enjoy creating easy-to-make learner exercises for English study!


Lesson Design

This is course is designed to teach students how to develop daily lesson plans (LP) in a simple and effective manner. Specifically, students will first learn how the fundamental elements of a LP (i.e. timing, processes, interactions, materials) support the lesson’s goals and objectives. Once
students have a clear understanding of these relationships, they will then look at how various
learning activities can be efficiently scaffolded. The LPs developed by students will then
constitute one of the main components of the student’s graduating portfolio.


Introduction to LMS

This course introduces students to Moodle, a web-based open source learning management system. By the end of the course, students will be able to:
1. set up and manage their own Moodle website on a web host,
2. deploy language learning content through various Moodle modules,
3. create online courses that are suitable for language learning.


Course Design

How should teachers or curriculum developers design courses or unit plans (UP) of study? This course is intended for students interested in enhancing understanding and in designing more effective curricula through a framework of course development processes.

These processes will involve how to (i) conduct a needs assessment, (ii) determine goals and objectives, (iii) conceptualize content, (iv) select and develop materials and activities, (v) organize content and activities, (vi) evaluate, and (vii) consider resources and constraints. The unit plans developed by students will then constitute one of the main components of their graduating portfolios, and can also serve as an excellent model for future planning.


Portfolio Development (Portfolio Track)

The Graduating Portfolio is intended to be a culminating project in the GS of TESOL program that illustrates a “capstone research experience.” Accordingly, it should synthesize and apply knowledge and theories gained from courses in the GS of TESOL program. It should meet the following criteria:

- be integrative; requires generation/application of ideas across courses; demonstrates learning.
- result in a concrete product that links ESL/EFL theory and research to practice.
- be of personal use to the student & educationally valuable by an audience of professional peers.

At the end of the course, Graduate School of TESOL students should have several basic components constructed that will constitute their portfolio.


Research Methodology 1 or 2 (Thesis Track)

This course is an introduction to the concepts, approaches, and methods of QUANTITATIVE research in TESOL and applied linguistics. Topics include formulation of research questions, research design, data collection, data analysis, and reporting research results. The course provides opportunities to read and critique empirical research papers. It also provides hands-on experience of planning empirical research on a topic of student interest.


Elective Courses


Teaching Listening & Speaking
Listening and speaking skills are important in addressing a foreign language. This course is designed to grasp the concept of teaching the two skills. Before the two skills, students will browse the core of the principles of language learning and teaching.


ELT Approaches & Methods
This course is a graduate-level course to introduce and critically examine a range of approaches and methods for teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students will analyze, demonstrate, and evaluate approaches and methods of instruction for English language learners.


Lesson Design Practicum 1
The general goal of this course is improve teachers-in-training and teachers’ knowledge, awareness, skills and attitude towards the practice of teaching of English. We will focus on the idea of Best Practices; i.e., those practices which help students to learn most effectively and efficiently. Participants will use reflective practice and the Experiential Learning Cycle to develop the skills to improve their own practice.


Bilingualism
1. Familiarize students with both the political contexts and the theories of language acquisition which underlie various approaches to bilingual and immersion education in other countries and the appropriateness of their application to Korea
2. Develop students’ ability to critical analyze the scholarly information available on bilingualism, particularly as this relates to the Korean English Education context.


ELT Program & Evaluation
The general goal of this will be to allow teachers-in-training to apply many of the concepts that they have learned regarding curriculum, course and material design and apply them to the evaluation of a hypothetical language learning program.


Testing & Assessment
This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental principles of language assessment. During the first part of the course, students will read about and discuss test design, construction, administration, and scoring. The course will also provide students with an opportunity to develop test items (e.g., multiple-choice items and extended-production tasks) and analyze actual test data during the second part of the course.


Teaching English to Young Learners
Consider the following dilemmas:
a) Young learners or young developers? Teaching “young learners” is nothing like teaching groups of unusually short adults. It is a matter of teaching English for developmental, and developing, purposes; in other words, not teaching young learners at all, but rather teaching young developers.
b) Language for communication or language for cognition? There are two very different developmental purposes for teaching English. One of them is indeed social and communicative. The other one, which is often more interesting and always more available to the child, is a language of self-communication, of imagination and make believe, of abstraction and generalization.
c) Focus on Form (FonF) or Content (CBI)? Instead of thinking about teaching young learners as a special case of EFL, it might make more sense to think of EFL as a special case of general preschool and elementary school child development:
Let us spend roughly a month on each.


Academic English Writing
We have a lot to do. All of it is difficult, most of it is interesting, and a lot of it is really a lot of fun (although sometimes it may not seem that way until it is quite over). Each week we look at two IDEAS (very often related, both to each other and to previous ideas). Each week we make them REAL by putting them into a piece of writing. At the end of fifteen weeks, you will have a complete thesis PROPOSAL. We shall also study some articles that I have written with my former students. In some ways they are models; in other ways they are good examples of what NOT to do!


Culture & Pragmatics
This course will explore issues as they relate to media, culture, and technology. Specifically, students will critically examine how new media (i.e. computers, the Internet, and digital media) is creating a new communications environment and is impacting the culture we all share.


Second Language Acquisition
This course is designed to introduce the field of second language acquisition (SLA) research. The goals of this course include enabling students (a) to develop a basic understanding of factors influencing second language learning, and (b) to engage in critical thinking about second language teaching. Students will explore the literature on the various issues of SLA. In reviewing and discussing the literature, students will develop an ability to read the SLA research and to write literature review.


Teaching Reading & Writing
The course focuses on current approaches to the teaching and learning of reading and writing in English as a second/foreign language. That is, students will become familiar with current reading theory and research with an understanding of various models of reading and with a focus on the writing process, effective instructional strategies for teaching reading and writing, the relationship between L1 and L2 reading and writing, and the assessment of second language readers and writers.


Teaching English Grammar
This course focuses on the central aspects of communicative grammar instruction (in contrast with traditional grammar translation instruction). Considerable attention is given to practical applications of grammar, although theoretical aspects of grammar instruction are referenced when necessary. By the end of the course, students will be able to:
1. define grammar and state why it’s worth teaching
2. evaluate the strengths and weaknesses in various grammar activities and lessons
3. analyze grammar patterns in terms of their form, meaning, and use


Lesson Design Practicum 2
A major component of this course will involve you teaching the lesson plan that you have developed in the ‘Lesson Design’ class last semester. Therefore, in order to take 'Lesson Design Practicum', you should have first taken 'Lesson Design'. This will be done as peer teaching. Integral to the micro-teaching will be post-teaching feedback sessions on your classroom management with both your peers and a teacher trainer. Each microteaching session will be filmed and the subsequent video will form the basis of a post-teaching reflection by each trainee.
The course will also include input sessions on basic classroom management techniques and materials adaptation/development which, in addition to classroom-based activities, will be supported by online discussion tasks.


Interculturalism & Communication
This course introduces students to main concepts and issues in intercultural communication and help them apply this knowledge to their own teaching contexts. A variety of interesting topics such as multiculturalism, identity, bilingualism, and world Englishes will be discussed in class.


Syntax & ELT
This course is designed to help students understand English Grammar/Syntax from modern linguistic perspectives, focusing on how to apply modern linguistics to classes.


Literature & ELT
This course is designed to introduce practical teaching methods using English literary works including poems, short novels, stories, and plays. Students will be reading representative and interesting literary works in order to enhance basic understanding of literature, and useful materials for English teaching methods will be provided as well.


Immersion Programs
1. Familiarize students with both the political contexts and the theories of language acquisition which underlie various approaches to bilingual and immersion education in other countries and the appropriateness of their application to Korea
2. Familiarize students with several models of immersion as practiced in other countries
3. Familiarize students with the political and educational arguments both for and against immersion models of bilingual education as they have been written about extensively in countries such as the U.S., Canada, Australia, the U.K., Singapore, the Philippines, Hong Kong and Catalonia.
4. Develop students’ ability to critical analyze the validity of various immersion models proposed or currently being used in Korea.


Web Contents in English Education
This course aims to produce students who can understand the core concepts and the major recent developments in WBI (Web-Based Instruction) and can apply it in a diverse range of classroom experiences. By the end of the course, students should be able to understand and use the following knowledge and skills: the concepts of WBI; the advantages and limitations of the internet and the Web; the current state of the Web and its significance for the Web for ELT/L; the roles of the Web, teachers, and students; teacher preparation and teacher training for WBI; the Web content and language skills development; CMC (Computer-Mediated Communication); exploring the examples of good practice in the use of the web; and discussion about future developments in the web in ELT/L.


Instructional Design for MALL
This course aims to introduce students to the theories and practice of instructional design for MALL. Students are required to understand and use the current theories and strategies of instructional design to develop appropriate MALL contents for English language teaching and learning. Topics include: technology and media, instructional strategies, visual principles, the ‘ASSURE’ model, computers and multimedia, distance education, online learning, instructional materials and displays, visuals, audio, video, as well as trends in technology and media.


Creation of Multimedia Elements
This course introduces students to different computer programs and web techniques that can be used to create, deploy, and host educational contents. There are two broad goals: (1) to develop ideas about how multimedia can be used in the language classroom, and (2) to create educational multimedia content for language learners.


ELT Materials Development
The goal of this course is to learn how to humanize and personalize a coursebook for your learners. Teachers teach from coursebooks, but coursebooks are never perfect. The difference between an OK language class and a great language class is often the teacher’s ability to select, adapt and supplement appropriate language learning materials and activities into an existing coursebook. The process of selecting and adapting and supplementing the appropriate materials almost always depends on the students that we are teaching. To help us better understand the process involved I have selected a recently published coursebook that we will be using to create, adapt and supplement materials for.